Poached rhubarb with oats, almonds & honey

Ingredients

  • 200g rhubarb, chopped into small chunks
  • 100ml orange juice
  • 2 tbsp rosewater
  • 3 tbsp honey
  • 100g oats
  • Generous dollop natural yoghurt
  • Handful toasted flaked almonds
oats in healthy rhubarb recipe

If you think that rhubarb is an acidic, sharp fruit that should only be enjoyed in a crumble, then think again. Firstly it’s not a fruit, it’s actually a vegetable – a relative of buckwheat and sorrel. And while it is indeed a delicious base for a comforting crumble, it’s much too good to confine to just one traditional dish.

Rhubarb has been used in Chinese medicine for thousands of years and with good reason – recent research into rhubarb has confirmed that it is indeed a potent plant with many health-boosting properties.

Rhubarb is a great source of polyphenols, which some studies suggest may help destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, when exposed to heat through baking or stewing, the anti-cancer properties are actually increased. Rhubarb has also been linked to helping lower cholesterol levels by inhibiting certain enzymes involved in cholesterol synthesis. It’s low in calories (although this benefit might be negated by adding sugar or honey to counteract the tartness!), high in fibre, and a good source of vitamin K, calcium and potassium, so definitely a feel-good food we should make the most of while it’s in season.

As well as the traditional crumble or fool, a little cooked rhubarb is a fantastic accompaniment to savoury dishes such as oily fish or duck. If you have any sweetened cooking juices left over from baking or stewing, try pouring them into the bottom of a glass and adding fizzy water for a truly refreshing cordial. And for a fabulous start to the day, look no further than this Greek-style gem for a delicious healthy rhubarb recipe.

Method

  1. Prepare this the night before. Gently poach the rhubarb with the orange juice and honey for a few minutes until softened. Drain the cooking liquid into a bowl and put the rhubarb to one side.
  2. Add the rosewater to the cooking liquid, then stir in the oats and yoghurt, together with half the cooked rhubarb and chopped nuts. Cover and leave in the fridge overnight.
  3. To serve, top with the remaining poached rhubarb and nuts and drizzle over a little extra honey to sweeten if needed.

Wellbeing Wisdom

  • Rhubarb is a great source of polyphenols, which some studies suggest may help fight cancer cells
  • Rhubarb is also high in fibre, vitamin K, calcium and potassium