Facial massage to restore radiance

A facial massage at home with pure plant oils is one of the fastest ways to wipe stress from our faces and restore radiance. Effective for all ages and skin types, Liz’s simple seven step acupressure plan will give you a gorgeously healthy glow.

Cold-pressed plant oils, such as peach kernel, almond, rosehip and hazelnut, are the best choices for facial massage. You can add a drop of your favourite essential oil for added aroma, or use a pre-blended facial oil enriched with a mix of potent botanicals, such as Liz Earle Superskin Concentrate. If you are sensitive to fragrance use a plain oil such as purified almond or coconut oil. After your massage, sweep away any oil residues with a cotton wool pad soaking in skin tonic and apply a thin layer of your favourite moisturiser.How to do a facial massage step 1 from Liz Earle Wellbeing

  1. Start by washing your hands and cleansing and toning your face, the pour a few drops of your chosen facial massage oil into the palm of one hand. Rub your palms together to warm the oil, close your eyes, take a deep breath and hold your palms over your face with eyes closed and take a few slow, deep breaths. Rest your eyes in the darkness and relax your shoulders and neck muscles.
  2. Place one palm over your forehead and the other on the back of your neck, press and hold firmly for 60 seconds. Keeping your hand on your forehead, gently rotate your neck, working with firm fingertip pressure around the back of the neck to ease any tight spots.
  3. Use both hands to massage the base of your skull, working with firm fingertip pressure around the backs of the ears, into the corners of the jaw and along the lower jawline, finishing at your chin. Repeat six times.
  4. Shake your shoulders and arms, allowing the muscles to soften and relax before using your thumb and forefinger to pinch along your jawline. Repeat backwards and forwards six times. Then, use your middle fingers to massage the apples of your cheeks to release and tension and tight spots.
  5. Press the pads of your thumbs against the sides of your nose at the top and smooth outwards, working down the nose. Use the side of your thumbs to sweep firmly and smoothly under each eye socket, from nose to temple. Repeat six times.
  6. Use the tips of your index fingers to press along your eyebrows, starting from the top of your nose and working outwards. Repeat six times. Then gently sweep your index fingers along your eyebrows and around the eye socket six times, finishing with a final press on the inner eye area.
  7. How to do a facial massage step 7 from Liz Earle WellbeingFinally, use your fingertips to lightly tap over your entire face, from the top of the forehead, down over the eye area, cheeks, side of the face, jawline and chin, working up, down and across to stimulate blood flow and bring fresh oxygen supplies from the depths of the dermis to the skin’s surface. Finish with a gentle sweep of your hands across your forehead, cheeks, chin and neck. Take several long slow deep breaths – and smile.
  8. Finally, use your fingertips to lightly tap over your entire face, from the top of the forehead, down over the eye area, cheeks, side of the face, jawline and chin, working up, down and across to stimulate blood flow and bring fresh oxygen supplies from the depths of the dermis to the skin’s surface. Finish with a gentle sweep of your hands across your forehead, cheeks, chin and neck. Take several long slow deep breaths – and smile.

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To moisturise and soothe tired, dehydrated skin why not try this gentle, fruity homemade banana face mask – it’s so easy to make!

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Wellbeing Wisdom

  • Cold-pressed plant oils, such as peach kernel, almond, rosehip and hazelnut, are the best choices for facial massage
  • Tapping your fingertips lightly over your entire face helps to stimulate blood flow and bring fresh oxygen supplies to the skin’s surface